Field Frame Friday: Anthropomorphism never looked so cute.

This four-month-old titi monkey (Plecturocebus cupreus) infant stuck his tongue out at the camera! Though it’s easy to assume this behavior was intentional and comedic, due to these monkeys’ close relatedness to us humans, this little one likely was unaware of what humor is. Anthropomorphism, wherein human characteristics are given to animals or objects, is…

Field Frame Friday: Diligent Dad Duty

Pictured here, a father titi monkey carries his one-week-old infant. Titi monkeys (Callicebinae spp.) show biparental care, in which the father does the majority of infant care and carrying. The mother nurses, but dad is on duty 24/7! [Photo by Alexander Baxter, Caption by Allison Lau] Mendoza, S. P., & Mason, W. A. (1986). Parental…

Field Frame Friday: Looked cute, might delete later.

While titi monkeys (Callicebinae spp.) are generally neophobic (i.e. afraid of new things), they do show wide variability in personality. This more adventurous coppery titi monkey (Plecturocebus cupreus) wanted to get a closer look at the camera lens! Pictured in the back is his six-month-old son. [Photo by Alexander Baxter, Caption by Allison Lau] Savidge,…

A Tail of Two Kitties: The Beauty of Being Blind

The classroom is very different from the real world. This is something those of us that study animals and their behavior understand on a fundamental level. However, seeing concepts play out in real life that are usually taught in university lecture halls can be surprising and powerful. Instead of seeing textbook figures on PowerPoint slides,…

Field Frame Friday: Happy Valentine’s Day!

Titi monkeys are pair-bonding monkeys. They engage in affiliative behaviors like the one depicted here: tail twining! Titi monkeys tail twine during the day in order to maintain contact with their partner, similar to hand-holding in humans. At night, titi monkeys tail twine to maintain proximity and help each other balance while sleeping! Happy Valentine’s Day!…

Field Notes: Singing Titi Monkeys

A typical morning of titi monkey vocalization recording starts off with a 4:30 AM alarm. I roll out of bed, start coffee, and am out in the door in under ten minutes. The 20-minute drive goes by quickly as I mechanically drink my coffee. As I gather my recorder, microphone, and camera, interns begin to show…

Newsroom: Monkey Eye Tracking

Photographs of CNPRC titi monkeys (Plecturocebus cupreus) and rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) [Source] In a collaboration between the Bales and Bauman Labs, researchers at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at UC Davis have validated a new method for eye tracking in non-human primates. Eye tracking is when a computer monitor and camera setup…

Field Frame Friday: Early mornings

Jungle breakfasts are usually creative: most gibbon groups begin singing as the sun rise, so breakfast is always eaten in the dark and often accompanied with a beautiful chorus. Each morning, we did fixed acoustic surveys based off two observers in order to triangulate group locations and estimate gibbons densities within our field site.  Pictured next…

Sunday Sketch: Ostrich Roar

Did you know? Similar to the tigers and lions, male ostriches can roar! This throaty roar is elicited during territorial encounters and is likely used to defend potential mates from intruders. Sketch contributed by Allison Lau Source: Bolwig, N. (1973). Agonistic and sexual behavior of the African Ostrich (Struthio camelus). The Condor, 75(1), 100-105.