Field Frame Friday: Looked cute, might delete later.

While titi monkeys (Callicebinae spp.) are generally neophobic (i.e. afraid of new things), they do show wide variability in personality. This more adventurous coppery titi monkey (Plecturocebus cupreus) wanted to get a closer look at the camera lens! Pictured in the back is his six-month-old son. [Photo by Alexander Baxter, Caption by Allison Lau] Savidge,…

Sci Hero: Dr. Roger Arliner Young

The Ethogram believes that science should be accessible and diverse in order to increase the sense of belonging within the science community. As a part of our continuing effort to make science a more inclusive field, we will be highlighting a “Sci Hero” each month so that the next generation of scientists and naturalists may…

Science Heroes: Dr. Roger Arliner Young

Welcome to Science Heroes, the column highlighting the incredible and diverse scientists and naturalists that if you don’t already know about them…you should! Our inaugural post features Dr. Roger Arliner Young, the first Black woman to graduate with a PhD in 1940!

Field Frame Friday: Summer Fieldwork Forecast?

I study how bird songs influence mating strategies in white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys) and am interested in how traffic noise impedes the ability to assess bird songs and subsequently affects their reproductive success. During this summer’s fieldwork at Tioga Pass in Yosemite, we woke up to something very unexpected…a snowstorm had hit overnight- in JUNE!…

Creature Feature: Ethiopian wolf

An elusive creature and the rarest canid in the world, the Ethiopian wolf is commonly referred to as the Simien fox. Despite its foxy nickname, bushy tail, and reddish fur, the Ethiopian wolf is actually a true wolf.

Field Frame Friday: Now you see them, now you don’t!

What happens when a pandemic strikes and travelers are no longer hiking or visiting natural areas? Research, of course! Since there are no visitors allowed in protected areas in Panama, I’m taking advantage of this opportunity to assess whether local forest mammals will avoid the trails less with fewer human visitors. I deployed cameras traps…

Field Frame Friday: Trot, trot, tölt!

Icelandic horses (Equus ferus caballus) are the only horse breed in the world that can perform five different gaits. Most horses can walk, trot, and canter, but Icelandic horses can also perform a flying pace and a tölt – these gaits, in which only one hoof touches the ground at a time, are useful given…

Field Frame Friday: Migrating mule deer!

Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are migratory ungulates and often their migratory routes intersect with human developments and urban areas. Development and urbanization have greatly impacted the migration routes of many migratory ungulates and have ultimately lead to the population decline of many of these animals. Mule deer do not adjust their migration routes to avoid…

Creature Feature: Grass carp

Grass carp, originally brought to the U.S. as lawnmowers for aquatic plants, can eat up to 100% of their body weight in vegetation every day.

Sunday Sketch: A little eye roll

The Chambered Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) is one of 6 extant species of nautilus, the closest living relative of coleoid cephalopods (octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish). Considered by many to be living fossils, nautiluses have experienced little morphological change over millions of years and are more similar to ancient cephalopods than modern coleoid cephalopods. Nautiluses have numerous…

Field Frame Friday: To know the seal, one must BE the seal!

When data collection is cancelled because of the pandemic, one must get creative to stay connected to their study species. For me, this means free-diving in Monterey Bay. Harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) are often found in the kelp forests, using different strategies for foraging and hunting. One strategy is called the sit-and-wait, where seals can…

Scholar Holler: Sabrina Mederos

It’s 2020 and this year has been full of surprises and lessons. In fact, one news site (The Atlantic) deemed 2020 as the “second-most traumatic year in American history”, and yet we still have months to go. While quarantining at home, attempting to get work done, I find myself reminiscing about simpler times, and reflecting…

Newsroom: In-air hearing in walruses

Sound travels much farther than visual cues in the marine environment. As a result, many marine mammals rely on sound to gather information about their surroundings, search for prey, avoid predators, and communicate with others of their species. For walruses, vocalizations play an important role in communication and mating displays during the breeding season. As their…

Sunday Sketch: Color me intrigued

Stump-tailed macaques (Macaca arctoides) are a vulnerable species of macaques found in South and Southeast Asia. These monkeys are known for their interesting color patterns. The infants of this species are born with white fur which gradually darkens with age. Older individuals are identified by their dark-colored faces with black or brown patches. Fact and…

Field Frame Friday: Moose? Mooses? Meese?

Moose (Alces americanus) will dive in lakes for aquatic plant species despite the fact that there is ample, accessible, nutritious, woody vegetation on land and swimming and diving is a more costly form of locomotion. This behavior used by moose to supplement terrestrial vegetation was a mystery until scientists discovered that aquatic plants are much…

Ask a Scientist: Caching

Why do I see some birds take seeds out of the bird feeder but hide them in our garden rather than just eat them?

Field Notes: Ruminations on integrated crop-livestock systems.

As I shifted the sheep from one grazed section of the field to the next luscious cover crop patch, they moved in threes, filling the width of the corridor.  They became more frantic to get to wherever the sheep in front was going, and the electric netting that formed the corridor leaned precariously on its side….

Creature Feature: Hummingbirds

Good things come in small packages! This saying perfectly describes our flying, flower-loving friends, the hummingbirds.

Ask a Scientist: Feeling Salty

Mild-mannered Manatee asks, “Why can’t fresh water fish survive in the ocean?” What a great question Mild-mannered Manatee! To answer your question, we need to learn a little bit about osmosis. Osmosis is the movement of water from less salty areas to more salty areas across a membrane. Cells, like the ones in your body,…