Sunday Sketch: Blood Sharing Bats

As their name suggests, vampire bats need to consume blood often to stay alive. Female vampire bats roost in groups, and when some bats aren’t able to get a meal, others in the same group will regurgitate their own meals to share! Research revealed that females who shared meals with an extensive network of nonrelatives…

Field Frame Friday: Grazing or lazing

Beef cattle (bos taurus) display individual differences in grazing behavior on rangelands such as those in California. Even same-breed cattle can exhibit a variety of grazing patterns, such as traversing more terrain, traveling further from water, and climbing higher elevation than their fellow herdmates. [Photo by Nick Chudeau and caption by Maggie Creamer] References Bailey,…

Sunday Sketch: Learning to pick your battles

Northern elephant seal harems (Mirounga angustirostris) are a cacophony of noises with males vocalizing at each other and occasionally getting into physical battles; what information is coded within those noises? Researchers at University of California, Santa Cruz used playback experiments (i.e. recording vocalizations and then playing the vocalizations back to other individuals) to discover that…

Field Frame Friday: Chameleon coloration

While many people think that chameleon coloration serves only as camouflage, chameleons also change color to communicate with other chameleons. These color changes maximize communication between chameleons while minimizing the change of predation. [Photo and caption by Meredith Lutz] Reference Stuart-Fox, D., & Moussalli, A. (2008). Selection for social signalling drives the evolution of chameleon…

Field Frame Friday: How do you like your eggs?

Due to warmer temperatures, egg incubation in tropical birds presents a different set of challenges than temperate species. To regulate temperatures, lesser noddies (Anous tenuirostris) will rotate the egg around the nest every 50 minutes, and when ambient temperatures get above 30℃ (86 ℉) , parents will actually lift off of the egg, and depend…

Newsroom: Counter culture

Does social learning help or hinder adaptive response to human-induced rapid environmental change? Human-induced rapid environmental change (HIREC), such as climate change, habitat fragmentation, and pollution, poses a potential threat to a variety of wildlife species. If or how it changes animals’ traits is a question of central importance bridging evolutionary ecology and conservation management….