Field Notes: California Plants and Pollinators

At least 87.5% of flowering plant species rely on animal pollinators such as bees, birds, bats and butterflies for help with reproduction [1]. Plant-pollinator mutual relationships contribute to biodiversity, ecosystem stability, and promote food security through crop pollination [2]. Much of the food and medicine we use comes from plants that need pollinators to reproduce….

Field Frame Friday: If you hear this, I am not aMOOsed!

Dairy calves may be adorable and photogenic, but they are also very noisy animals! Research has shown that their vocalizations can indicate their affective state and emotions! [Photo and caption by Isabelle McDonald-Gilmartin] Green, A. C., Johnston, I. N., & Clark, C. E. F. (2018). Invited review: The evolution of cattle bioacoustics and application for…

Sci Hero: Dr. Margaret Collins

The Ethogram believes that science should be accessible and diverse in order to increase the sense of belonging within the science community. As a part of our continuing effort to make science a more inclusive field, we will be highlighting a “Sci Hero” each month so that the next generation of scientists and naturalists may be inspired and identify with the diverse community that came before them.

The Cat Who Caused an Ecological Disaster

From the humor they provide in funny pet videos to the physical comfort of waking up next to a furry friend in the morning, your ordinary housecat is probably a source of  great joy in your life. Unfortunately, cats have had a mostly negative impact in the ecosystems we’ve introduced them to. Many cats are…

Field Frame Friday: But first, let me take a selfie!

A young male baboon takes a selfie with a high-resolution thermal camera. Before this teenager got excited about his photo shoot in the middle of the night, the thermal camera was videoing him and his group-mates (background right) as they moved around their sleeping cliff. Baboons face a significant risk of being eaten by leopards…

Sci Hero: Katherine Johnson

The Ethogram believes that science should be accessible and diverse in order to increase the sense of belonging within the science community. As a part of our continuing effort to make science a more inclusive field, we will be highlighting a “Sci Hero” each month so that the next generation of scientists and naturalists may be inspired and identify with the diverse community that came before them.

Science Heroes: Katherine Johnson

Welcome to Science Heroes, the column highlighting incredible scientists and naturalists that if you don’t know, you should! This month highlights mathematician Katherine Johnson!

Creature Feature: Golden-crowned Sparrow

Once upon a time, in a land far from people, a tiny egg cracked in its nest. Slowly, a small beak pushed through, delicately casting pieces of eggshell aside. It was followed by dark grey bulges that were closed eyes, and finally a floppy, mostly featherless and helpless body that weighed only 3 grams [1]….

Field Notes: Settling into a Field Site and Embracing my Inner Limpet

As I summit Everest, sweating from exertion with the sun glaring on my face, I turn my gaze downward and sweep the creviced ground with my eyes. The creatures I am here to study are inconspicuous, blending into the rocks with their grey, ridged shells. Their species name is Siphonaria gigas, the Greek gigas meaning “giant,” and these…

Creature Feature: Coastal Cutthroat Trout

Fog rolls in one drizzly May morning on the Olympic Peninsula of northwestern Washington. The precipitation is somewhere between mist and rain, decreasing visibility to about a hundred feet in the temperate rainforest. The river is high, but still clear, and there is only one other car in the boat launch parking lot. May is…

Sci Hero: Dr. Ernest Everett Just

The Ethogram believes that science should be accessible and diverse in order to increase the sense of belonging within the science community. As a part of our continuing effort to make science a more inclusive field, we will be highlighting a “Sci Hero” each month so that the next generation of scientists and naturalists may be inspired and identify with the diverse community that came before them.

Science Heroes: Dr. Ernest Everett Just

Welcome to Science Heroes, the column highlighting incredible scientists and naturalists that if you don’t know, you should! This month highlights embryologist and marine biologist Dr. Ernest Everett Just!

Whale Hello There!

Check out this whaley nice piece of art by one of our young explorers!

Creature Feature: Whale barnacles

If you look closely at a photo of a southern right whale (Eubalaena australis), you’ll see that few animals accessorize quite like they do. Their crusty white ‘bonnet’ (which looks more like a mustache, if you ask me) complete with their classic goatee and cumulus eyebrows truly set them apart as charismatic megafauna. But what…

Sunday Sketch: Color me impressed

Chromatophores are cells that change pigments and reflect light and incephalopods (e.g. octopus, squid) can be rapidly changed by shifting pigmentsand reorienting reflective plates in the cells using their muscles! Caribbean reefsquid (Sepioteuthis sepioidea) use their chromatophores for camouflage andcommunication! Flashes of changing colors and patterns between squids are oftenseen during courtship and sometimes these…

Sci Hero: Dr. Temple Grandin

The Ethogram believes that science should be accessible and diverse in order to increase the sense of belonging within the science community. As a part of our continuing effort to make science a more inclusive field, we will be highlighting a “Sci Hero” each month so that the next generation of scientists and naturalists may be inspired and identify with the diverse community that came before them.

Creature Feature: Tammar wallaby

Got Milk? This phrase, while ubiquitous in magazine and television advertisements cheekily paired with milk-mustachioed celebrities, is also an easy way to distinguish mammals from other species. While the first mammal you may think of in response to this question is likely a cow, human, or maybe even a goat, one lesser-known (and arguably the…

Science Heroes: Dr. Temple Grandin

Welcome to Science Heroes, the column highlighting incredible scientists and naturalists, such as animal welfare scientist and autism awareness advocate, Dr. Temple Grandin!

Field Notes: Do You Prefer Your Salmon Hot or Iced?

If you’ve been following the information stream on climate change, you have likely heard of global warming. And, if you happen to be interested in fish or marine life (like yours truly), you also probably know that this means many of the world’s water systems are projected to increase in temperature . Even at face…

Creature Feature: Kea

Many animals are afraid of humans, and with good reason. Then there is the kea (Nestor notabilis), a playful bird known for its intelligence, wild curiosity, and general disregard for the “stay away from humans” rule. This New Zealand native was named by the Māori people for its distinct call: a bright, high-pitched keee-aaa!