Sunday Sketch: Badger’s Buddy

North America’s coyote and badger species are regularly found hunting together as a team. As they employ different hunting methods for driving out the same prey, one will dig up the quarry while the other gives chase- allowing them to capture three times as much food. Happy Year of the Dog! Sketch and fact contributed…

Sunday Sketch: Galentines Day

Still looking for the perfect date for Valentine’s Day? Maybe this is the year to take a leaf from the female Komodo dragon’s book. When there are no males around,  female Komodo dragons can still produce fertile eggs! When scientists first documented this they thought that they were storing sperm from previous interactions with males…

Sunday Sketch: Weather Bee

Did you know? In honor of groundhog day, here’s an animal that can really predict the weather! Sensing drops in barometric pressure, as well as other changes in the environment, a honeybee hive puts in extra work in before a rain. Sketch and fact contributed by Victor Santiago Source: Xujiang, He & Tian, Liu-Qing &…

Sunday Sketch: Armadillo Quadruplets

Did you know? The nine-banded armadillo nearly always gives birth to identical quadruplets! If she has a hard time telling them apart, don’t blame her: she has her hands full! Fact and sketch contributed by Amelia Munson Sources: Stockard, C. R. (1921). A probable explanation of polyembryony in the armadillo. The American Naturalist, 55(636), 62-68….

Sunday Sketch: Grandma Aphid

Did you know? In many aphid species, a female will regularly give birth to a live clone. These newborn clones already contain a developing daughter within them. Termed “telescopic generation”, this allows aphids to multiply very quickly with or without males. So, the next time you’re pulling out your hair over these little bugs, be…

Sunday Sketch: Tarantula Appetite

Did you know? Tarantulas can go up to two years between meals! When food sources are scarce, tarantulas are able to slow their metabolism to conserve energy until their next meal. For more information: Philip, B. N., & Shillington, C. (2010). The effect of prey availability on metabolism and activity in the tarantula Phormictopus cancerides….

Sunday Sketch: Hamster Party!

Did you know? Golden hamsters (Phodopus cambelli) can ingest nearly eight times the amount of alcohol than humans can- without showing signs of impairment. This high tolerance is due to a specialized metabolism, since their staple food source throughout the winter consists of seeds that undergo fermentation. Older Hamsters can even prefer food with a…

Sunday Sketch: Six White Boomers

Did you know? According to lore, in Australia, Santa Claus gives Dasher, Dancer and all the other reindeer a break in favor of “Six White Boomers” or kangaroos! And they probably serve him well–although not white, male red kangaroos can cover almost 30 feet in one hop! Sketch and fact contributed by Amelia Munson ***…

Sunday Sketch: Giraffe Necks

  Did you know? Even though giraffes’ necks are around six feet long when full grown, they have the same amount of vertebrae as most other mammals. Those seven vertebrae have to be awfully long and strong, because male giraffes use their huge necks to fight other males for access to mates! For more information:…

Sunday Sketch: Reindeer Games

Did you know? Reindeer are the only deer species where both males and females grow antlers. Though the males shed their antlers in late autumn after mating season, the females retain theirs throughout the winter pregnancy to defend scarce food patches. It is likely then, that Rudolph was in fact a female rather than a…

Sunday Sketch: Flying Mammals

Did you know? Bats are the only mammals that can fly! Other “flying” mammals like sugar gliders, flying squirrels, and colugos cannot truly fly: they can only glide for short distances. Bats, however, are capable of powered flight for long durations. For more information on the evolution of bat flight: Zhang, G., Cowled, C., Shi,…