Field Frame Friday: Gelada battles

Herein lies one of the many fights between the dominant leader male of the “D” group, Demon, and his predecessor turned “grandpa”, Devil. The geladas (Theropithecus gelada) of the Simien Mountains in Ethiopia typically live in one-male unit groups, however, the dominant male occasionally allows a predecessor to stay on or a follower to tag…

Field Frame Friday: Beach baboons

A threat display from an olive baboon (Papio anubis) produces a submissive response from a second individual. Dominance (relative rankings of animals) is a major guiding force in many animal societies. In fact, in male olive baboons, more certain dominance hierarchies is associated with lower average levels of cortisol, a hormone that is typically associated…

Field Frame Friday: An oldie but agouti

Agoutis are terrestrial rodents that can be found throughout Central and South America. If you come across these creatures you are most likely to find them traveling in pairs and perusing the forest floor for fruits and seeds. Due to these foraging patterns, these animals are known to have important ecosystem roles as seed dispersers…

Field Frame Friday: Zany zebu

Zebu (Bos indicus or Bos taurus) are a species of domestic cattle that can be seen in many countries throughout Asia and Africa. They can be easily spotted by the fatty deposit atop their backs, and are popular due to their adaptability to hot and arid environments. These animals have many uses for humans including…

Field Frame Friday: Early mornings

Jungle breakfasts are usually creative: most gibbon groups begin singing as the sun rise, so breakfast is always eaten in the dark and often accompanied with a beautiful chorus. Each morning, we did fixed acoustic surveys based off two observers in order to triangulate group locations and estimate gibbons densities within our field site.  Pictured next…

Field Frame Friday: Elephant friends

Forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) unlike their cousins to the east spend the majority of their time deep in the thick Central African rain forests. Once thought to be the same species, forest and savannah elephants have been distinguished as different species due to a host of morphological and genetic differences (Roca et al., 2001). This…

Field Frame Friday: Mystery arthropods

  Scientists estimate that up to 86% of eukaroytic species (Composed primarily of animals, plants, fungi) on land have not been described (Mora et al., 2011). There may be about 5.5 million species of insects, approximately 80% of which have not been described (Stork, 2018). The photo series shows some interesting looking insects and arachnids…

Field Frame Friday: Feeding “frenzy”

Caribbean reef sharks (Carcharhinus perezi) are members of a reef-associated species that lives in the tropic waters of the western Atlantic and greater Caribbean (Compagno, 1984). This photograph was taken in Bimini, Bahamas, as part of a volunteer opportunity at the Bimini Biological Field Station “Shark Lab”. In this area, a profitable ecotourism industry has arisen…

Field Frame Friday: Lemur siesta

This week we introduce a new biweekly feature: Field Frame Friday, where we feature some of the best pictures from our fieldwork.   Greater bamboo lemurs can be found in bamboo forests in the eastern rainforests of Madagascar. Their range, however, is severely fragmented, and the species is highly endangered (Wright et al., 2008). Here…