Field Frame Friday: Gear up!

Throwback to last spring, just before leaving Davis for Lee Vining, CA for two months. In addition to the Potter traps that I use to catch birds, you can see I had to pack a lot of food for a 2-week quarantine due to the Covid-19 pandemic. [Photo and caption by Carly Hawkins] Carly studies…

Field Frame Friday: GoT vs. GoaT

“The Mountain” may have been a fearsome Game of Thrones character, but these mountain goats, hiking high above King’s Landing (the walled city of Dubrovnik, Croatia) on Mount Srđ, are anything but. Mountain goats in areas of human establishments are noted to be more alarmed by motor disturbances, such as cars on highways built near…

Field Frame Friday: Don’t feed the neighbors.

Most coyotes (Canis latrans) are fearful of humans. Unfortunately, some coyotes lose this fear which can lead to less than ideal interactions between coyotes and humans or their pets. While this is very rare, the loss of fear is often facilitated by human behavior. This coyote is fed regularly by a homeowner whose property sits…

Field Frame Friday: GOODBYE 2020, HELLO 2021

Hello from your Field Series editors! We just wanted to pop in and say that 2020 was a difficult year for researchers all over the globe. For many of us animal behaviorists that rely on collaborators, animal managers, interns, and others in the academic and non-academic community for help and support, COVID required us to…

Field Frame Friday: Rockin’ Around the Ocean Floor

While some of us are rockin’ around adorning our bristly Christmas tree tops with twinkling stars, brittle stars (Class: Ophiuroidea) adorn sea floors around the world. This little star, found on the shores of western France, has relatives in the tropical reefs of Hawaii, the sediments of the Arctic, and even floors of the deep…

Field Frame Friday: Diligent Dad Duty

Pictured here, a father titi monkey carries his one-week-old infant. Titi monkeys (Callicebinae spp.) show biparental care, in which the father does the majority of infant care and carrying. The mother nurses, but dad is on duty 24/7! [Photo by Alexander Baxter, Caption by Allison Lau] Mendoza, S. P., & Mason, W. A. (1986). Parental…

Field Frame Friday: Let’s all do the waggle dance!

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) need lots of nectar to make stored honey for the winter. When one bee finds a good patch of flowers she will tell her colony mates where the food is through a waggle dance, which communicates both the direction and distance to the food. It’s similar to how seeing one ant…

Field Frame Friday: Share the shore!

Pinnipeds (i.e. seals, sea lions, and walruses) are considered amphibious marine mammals, meaning they spend significant parts of their life on land. For example, this elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), hauled out on a popular beach in Point Reyes National Seashore during mating season (which has begun on the coast of California). These animals spend a…

Field Frame Friday: “Retro” Research Methods

In the age of technology, animal behavior scientists are able to use high-definition videos, behavioral coding software, and strings of code to help with their research. Sometimes however, there is nothing quite like hanging out with your research journal and your very own eyeballs observing and recording what animals are doing. This can often be…

Field Frame Friday: Bike safety meets surf safety?

What are those dark purple lumps on the rocks below? The sea urchins, Colobocentrotus atratus, have earned several nicknames for their distinctive body shape, including “helmet urchin” and “shingle urchin.” Unlike other urchins covered in long, sharp spines, C. atratus have a smooth body and flattened spines. Their unique body plan helps them withstand pounding…