Field Frame Friday: Toothy and goofy!

Ruminant animals, like cows, don’t have upper incisors like many other animals, and instead have what is called a dental pad. This pad helps the cows to pinch the grass from the ground. The combination of the dental pad and tongue makes a very efficient system for grazing.  Eubanks, D. L. (2012). Dental Considerations in Cows and…

Field Frame Friday: Tree Tadpoles

While the joys of fieldwork are many, sometimes field research involves a lot of time staring at immobile study subjects high in the trees. I study coppery titi monkeys (Plecturocebus cupreus), who spend much of their day in the canopy foraging or resting. While titis do move throughout the day, they spend multiple hours at…

Field Frame Friday: We’re Baaaaaaaaack!

Just like this spooky little cormorant (Phalacrocoracidae), Field Frame Friday is back just in time for October! After a brief hiatus, Field Frame Fridays will now be posted every other Friday. This is no trick, but we are hoping these posts will be more of an anticipated treat with our slower schedule. See what I…

Field Frame Friday: Lessons on the Range

Vegetation sampling is a crucial part of research involving rangeland cattle grazing. It is a way to quantify how much and of what type forage cattle are consuming throughout the grazing season. It can help range and animal scientists understand grazing patterns and preferences of cattle while also looking at the environmental impact of grazing…

Field Frame Friday: Inside Out Lunch

Seastars literally turn inside out when they are feeding! To start their meal, stars will force open the shell of the invertebrate (such as the cockle shown here) using their underbelly suction discs, after which they insert their stomach through their mouth parts and into the shell. The stomach will secrete digestive juices that breakdown…

Field Frame Friday: Plumbing Project or Pinniped Puzzle?

Before my field season, my garage turns into a Santa’s workshop- if Santa were a seal and the workshop made only food puzzles. Prepping for my field season means lots of trips to the hardware store and getting confused looks from the employees on why I have my arms full of PVC pipes while I…

Field Frame Friday: Shake that tail feather!

Spotted on the border of Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo, this male African Paradise Flycatcher (Terpsiphone viridis) uses his long tail feathers to attract a mate, for life. During the mating season his 2 central tail feathers will grow to be 30 cm (or almost a foot) long, so that he can put on…

Field Frame Friday: Harbor Seal Class of 2021

The best part of my field season is seeing the subjects that I worked with while they were in rehabilitation get released back into the ocean! These harbor seal pups came to The Marine Mammal Center (MMC) in Sausaltio, CA as young as a few days old, malnourished, and separated from their moms. But after…