Newsroom: Just the Tipping Points

Check out how male water strider mating tactics exhibit tipping points based on group size and composition in our latest Newsroom piece by ABGG student Adrian Perez!

Field Frame Friday: Food poisoning continues to curse California condors.

Did you know that this scavenger gets food poisoning, but maybe not in the “rotten meat” way you think. In the 1980s, California condors (Gymnogyps californianus) were considered extinct in the wild due to many factors, but largely from unintentional lead poisoning from bullet fragments left in terrestrial animal carcasses. Due to captive breeding there…

Field Notes: Singing Titi Monkeys

A typical morning of┬átiti monkey vocalization recording starts off with a 4:30 AM alarm. I roll out of bed, start coffee, and am out in the door in under ten minutes. The 20-minute drive goes by quickly as I mechanically drink my coffee. As I gather my recorder, microphone, and camera, interns begin to show…

Sunday Sketch: Ultimate marine predator vs. the panda of the ocean

Duhdum. Duhdum. Duhdumduhdumduh-move over Jaws soundtrack, the long (wrongly) vilified white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) is now being replaced with a top predator that you may not expect: killer whales (Orcinus orca)! White sharks and transient (i.e. marine mammal eating) killer whales have similarly preferred food sources, and in the northeastern Pacific, there is regional overlap…

Field Frame Friday: Dimethylsulfoniopropionate: what a mouth full… of food.

Bluefin trevally (Caranx melampygus) or ‘omilu in Hawaiian are able to detect dimethylsulfoniopropionate (say that 5 times fast, or just say DMSP). DMSP is a chemical produced by phytoplankton (marine algae) that is an indicator of food productivity. This chemosensory adaptation is important for foraging success! [Photo and caption by Karli Chudeau] DeBose, J.L., Nevitt,…

Field Frame Friday: Garibaldi neighbors respect the “no trespassing” signs.

Garibaldi (Hypsypops rubicundus) are territorial fish. Males will clear bottom territories and combat other fish and even SCUBA divers that come too close to their territory. However, it is uncommon that there is intraspecfic aggression; Garibaldis generally “respect” each other’s territories, so there is no need for aggression within species. [Photo by Nick Chudeau and…

Newsroom: A Bee of All Trades

Check out our newest piece by ABGG grad student Adrian Perez, telling us all about the task repertoire of honeybees!

Sunday Sketch: Convict Cichlid

Did you know that the convict cichlid (Amatitlania siquia), a monogamous fish species that forms long-lasting pairs, can exhibit pessimism? In a recent study, female fish selected male partners and were then paired with preferred or non-preferred partners. The fish that were paired with non-preferred partners did not spawn as quickly as the others. Furthermore,…

Field Frame Friday: This is my ‘Don’t mess with me’ face

This lone male clearly wants to range alone as he is trying to scare us off by displaying aggressive behaviors. Aggression in macaques, and in this example long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), can be identified via the intense direct stare, raised eyebrows and round “open threat face”.  [Photo and caption by Josephine Hubbard] Reference Van Hooff, J. A. R. A. M. (1967)….